It is a symposium held in Tokyo once a year, widely open to the public, already held 9 times since 1995. A good opportunity it is for people to exchange opinions with such experts or with many people. Sometimes restoration procedure is reported from JSA members, and we have interesting reports from contributors of Angkor.

ĄThe 9th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
18th Oct 2004
at the Forum of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
"Bayon - Where does the magnetism come from -"

Bayon, which is famous of great faces of towers, is one of the structure of the Angkor monuments that is at great risk of collapse. It is also a monument that JSA has been making efforts for the conservation and restoration. When you stand in front of Bayon, the first thing you see is the powerful, energetic rock mountain like high towers, and the giant 173 deity faces curved on the surface of the towers. There are many theories for the meaning of the giant deity faces. To solve the mystery of these faces were one of the important tasks. Together with art history studies, experts from other fields will discuss the theme "Bayon-where does the magnetism come from-". We will also seek, what we must conserve and what we must pass to the next generation paying attention to the Bayon Master Plan, which JSA is working out now.

Display of JSA activities Introduction of panelists Video corner
Lecture Panelists Exhibition of the deity faces of
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ĄThe 8th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
12th Oct 2004
at the forum of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
"Angkor past, present and future"

If we wish to gain a deeper understanding about Angkor today (present), we must find the beginning in the past. Such efforts will help to open the door to the future. How can we re-examine the relation between Angkor and the world through a cyclical thinking process that looks to the past to create the future by way of the present? In this year's symposium, we will be creating an opportunity to develop the argument regarding the past, present and future of Angkor with a conscious awareness of a seeking another possibility of Angkor. Regarding the contents of lectures and panel discussions, we plan to discuss the natural environment of Cambodia that has played an integral part of the lives of the people in Cambodia since the Angkor Era to the present, the art of Angkor within Asia, the meaning of conservation and the practical use of Angkor monuments for the future of Cambodia and Cambodians, and so on. Through a re-examination of the past, present and future of Angkor from a wider field and perspective, we would like to throw light on many issues we face today that must be solved in specific terms, and discuss how Angkor can will itself to participate in the world.

Part 1 of the symposium began with the showing of a videotape, "Eternal Angkor-Past, Present and Future-". It was then followed by JSA Director General Nakagawa, first introduced each of the monuments of pre-Angkor period and described their future maintenance plans. He primarily focused on the group of monuments erected during the pre-Angkor period. In addition, Mr. Nakagawa presented several interesting perspectives for envisioning the evolution of the pre-Angkor era into a dynamic civilization of the ensuing Angkor era. Next report was about the natural environment of Cambodia that has played an integral part of the lives of the people in Cambodia since the Angkor Era to the present, the art of Angkor within Asia, the wide range of NGO activities carried out by the Nginn Karet Foundation for Cambodia (NKFC), and a report of an activities of APSARA in Angkor district.

Based on the presentations given in Part 1, they discussed various issues and visions concerning the past, present, and future of Angkor. All the panelists agreed on the view that the young generation of Cambodians should take the initiative in conserving the Angkor monument in the future. They reaffirmed the significant role of APSARA, to which Mr. Im Sokrithy, a representative of that young generation, belongs, and renewed their determination of strengthening the ties between Japan and Cambodia. This symposium brought together experts who are active not only in the study of the conservation and restoration of monuments, but experts in various other fields extending to social and cultural issues in the broad sense-e.g., assisting the village people living in the vicinity of the monument and preserving the natural environment surrounding the monument-and served as an exceptional opportunity for the exchange of precious views and information.

ĄThe 7th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
20th Oct 2001
at the forum of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
The Conservation and Restoration Map of Angkor monuments

At the time of 2001, the Angkor monuments were becoming an international forum for conservation and restoration, with ten survey and restoration teams from wight countries actively working to preserve the monuments. Under such circumstances, the main objective of this symposium was to introduce specific restoration activities of each team from each country, and to report on the progress of activities carried out by JSA. This year's video presentation, therefore, not only showed JSA activities, but the activities of each country team as well. With their cooperation, a video entitled "Protecting the Angkor Monuments: Restoration Teams of the World at work" was completed and presented at the symposium.

As keynote presentations, experts from other restoration teams were invited to report on the activities, results, and future issues of their respective restoration teams. Furthermore, JSA members reported on current JSA activities and on the Bayon Symposium, and introduced the activities of foreign teams who were not present at this symposium.

A panel discussion was then held based on these presentations. The panelists talked about the significance of comprehensively regarding the restoration activities of each country, imminent problems, and future perspectives. A discussion was also held concerning the relationship between the characteristics of conservation and restoration methods of each team and their standardization. It was pointed out that the simultaneous implementation of various restoration methods should be considered a remarkable feat in itself, and therefore should not be combined into one method at the present. In response to this opinion, JSA Director General Nakagawa also expressed the view that various restoration methods may be relativized as each team mutually learns and influences each other, and implied that there should be no rushing to standardize differing restoration methods. Other topics of discussion ranged from technical restoration methods to the significance on modern society of the meaning behind "international cooperation" produced from the conservation and restoration activities of the Angkor monuments.

ĄThe 6th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
21st Oct 2000
at the International conference hall of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
"Misteries of Angkor - What should we preserve?"

There is no end to the enigmas of the Angkor monuments. But it is possibly in those very enigmas that the traditional view of the world that exist in Khmer culture are reflected. And it is these very enigmas that make Angkor so fascinating. The efforts should be continued to solve these enigmas, rather than to ignore or erase them in the process of conservation, and to transmit those enigmas to later generations should they remain unsolved. This year's theme of the symposium was proposed under such point of view.

Part 1 of the symposium began with the showing of a videotape, "Mysteries of Angkor-What Should We Preserve?". It was then followed by technical reports presented by Professor Hans Leisen, Director General of GACP (German Apsara Conservation Project) and five JSA members. Professor Leisen introduced the activities of GACP and some of the problems encountered in the conservation of Apsara sculptures. The five JSA members presented reports in their respective fields.

Discussions developed into such issues as the education of Cambodian experts in conservation, the relation between peace in Cambodia and Angkor, the significance of Angkor for Cambodian people of today, and to the question of ways in which Japan should relate with Cambodia. Comments were also made during discussions from Cambodian Ambassador to Japan, who also answered a question from the audience. The symposium was very fruitful.

ĄThe 5th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
6th Nov 1999
at the forum of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
"The Restoration works of Bayon in Angkor Thom, Report of the works and Evalution"

In the wake of the completion of the restoration work for the Northern Library at Bayon in Angkor Thom (September 1999), this year's theme of the symposium was the process of restoration work, which was reported comprehensively and evaluated by experts from various countries. In addition, the future problems in restoration work of the Angkor monuments were discussed.

Following a video of "The Restoration works of the Northern Library of Bayon", three discussion members who are members of JSA and were involved with restoration work gave reports on the work in the first session.

In response to the reports made in the first session, four evaluators made evaluations and gave their opinions in the second session. Some evaluator introduced the case study of Baphuon Temple, which he was in charge of, and he emphasized the importance of different ways to deal with respective ruins because each has different structural problems. Some mentioned that the impact of restoration projects should be evaluated because the preservation and restoration work of the Angkor monuments is not only the restoration work of Cambodian cultural heritage but also relevant to technical transfers, tourism, development, and cultural reconstruction planning for the country.

ĄThe 4th International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
31st Oct 1998
at the Architectural Institute hall
"Angkor monuments and the Conservation and Restoration techniques of the monuments in tropical Southeast Asia"

The symposium reached fourth time and this time, the Angkor monuments were viewed in the broader context of the conservation and restoration of cultural monuments in tropical Southeast Asia at large, including Vietnam and Thailand.

After a video of JSA activities, entitled "Khmer Artisans", case studies of the conservation and restoration of cultural monuments were reported by each discussant. Various issues on the conservation and restoration of Angkor monuments were discussed, including the applicability at Angkor of techniques used elsewhere, as well as legal and social aspects of monuments conservation and restoration.

In Part Two, a special lecture entitled, "Five Year Plan for the Conservation and Restoration of the Bayon", was given by Mr. Vann Molyvann. Mr. Vann Molyvann proposed that Japanese organizations engaged in the conservation and restoration of Angkor monuments be unified. Prof. Nakagawa, on the other hand, emphasized the importance of eventually transferring all activities currently conducted by Japanese organizations to Cambodians.

ĄThe 3rd International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
26th Oct 1997
at the Architectural Institute hall
"The Art and Architecture of Khmer - Restoration of Bayon and Themes to carry on - "

ĄThe 2nd International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites

19th Oct 1996
at Sougetsu hall
"Restoration of Angkor monuments and Cultural cooperation for Cambodia"
ĄThe 1st International Symposium for the Conservation of Angkor Monument sites
19th Oct 1995
at the forum of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership
"How should we restore Angkor"